January 2013

01/01

I spent most of the day preparing for the conversion to a consultant’s life after spending 17 years with ICRC where I served as President and COO.

With respect to the car, I worked on this site getting it organized and adding more page views, transferring documentation from my build journal to get the site closer to being up to date and doing more research on the potential use of the ISIS(tm) Intelligent Multiplex System as an alternative for wiring my roadster with a traditional wiring system. The ISIS(tm) system essentially replaces the traditional wiring harness reducing weight and complexity with a more robust, flexible and distributed electrical control and power distribution system.

Considering the current simplicity of the Ron Francis wiring system the use of ISIS(tm) might be overkill in terms of both costs and the need for a computer controlled power management system. It intrigues me on an intellectual level as well as potential for use in future more complex builds like the GTM, Daytona or 818.

Several FFR customers have installed the system in the GTM and 33 Roadster models and there have been a couple of installations in the Mk 4 Roadster. For more information on the system visit http://www.isispower.com.

01/02

I wrote ISIS and received the following reply from Jay Harris as to how best configure a system for a roadster:

“Hello Carl,

Happy New Year!  Thanks for your interest in our ISIS Intelligent Multiplex System.

I’d suggest out 3-Cell Kit with the standard front-engine configuration for your Mk4 roadster.  We started the aftermarket part of our business with guys building Factory Five cars and this configuration was what we originally used.  This link will take you to the actual input and output list for the configuration.  It identifies all of the wire colors to the MASTERCELL and POWERCELLs.

http://www.isispower.com/filebase/src/Manuals/Front_engine_10_3.pdf

This link on our blog gives you more information on how the configuration sheet works.

http://www.isispower.com/filebase/src/Manuals/Front_engine_10_3.pdf

A lot of our customers add inLINK to their 3-Cell Kit.  This gets you integrated remote control of things like lights and door poppers from a key fob.  It also gets you powerful security functions for your car, which is especially valuable for an open topped roadster.  Here’s more information on inLINK.

http://isispower.blogspot.com/2011/08/isis-inlink-rf.html

http://isispower.blogspot.com/2012/03/isis-inlink-security.html

Their responsiveness to my query was very good and the links are proving very helpful in deciding whether to use this system on the roadster.

01/03

After reviewing all the materials provided by Jay Harris and the Utube videos of the ISIS(tm) installation, I have decided to add the system to my build plan. My primary reasons for doing so are: 1. The added security the system provides (for a car that cannot be locked up); 2. The reduced wiring and less complexity required to get all systems wired up and running; and, 3. the much increased reliability of the electrical system with a very simple built in diagnostics system.

01/05

It has been too cold in the garage to get anything done these last few days. I have investigated getting a propane powered heater installed and have pretty much decided on a 60k BTU/hr input Hot Dawg ® Model HDS Separated-Combustion, Gas Fired Unit Heater. The separated combustion draws air for combustion from the outside reduces the common complaint of other units, that produce a very humid heat which causes corrosion on items in the garage (like all those tools you bought to build your dream car).

This is the heater I have chosen for the garage heating in my 3 car garage where I will be building the FFR Roadster.

This is the heater I have chosen for the garage heating in my 3 car garage where I will be building the FFR Roadster.

The heater must be installed by a certified professional to meet code requirements so my guess is the all in costs will be around $1500. You can go cheaper but you take more risks with fires and rust issues by using portable units.

01/08

A setback on the garage renovation project today. I decided to install a different garage door opener on the double door which would eliminate the track system going down the middle of the ceiling; it would give me more storage room in the garage overhead. Well after installing the device, the installer could not get the door to operate properly because of some previous damage on the door. His recommended fix, of course, is to put in a new door. This was not in my original budget and these things are not cheap as it turns out. Needless to say this is causing major uproar in the house (if you know what I mean). As my wife sees it, we had a garage door that worked, we paid a lot for the new opener, and now it nothing works. She is right and I was wrong. I should have questioned installing it on a door that was less than perfect; the installer admitted he should not have installed it on a door that was less than perfect. It looks like the only fix is going to be a new door.

01/09

Well after the fiasco yesterday we had two new garage doors installed, both much improved from the contractor grade doors we had before. Almost 2 inches thick they are well insulated and have windows in the top panel which adds a lot of light to the garage.

01/17

After getting an estimate to put in the propane heater I had to come up with another solution. The HDS model I wanted would cost $2800 to install and the HD model would cost about $1700; both being way over the budget for the heat to the garage. Back to more research.

1/19-22

I got some work done in the garage getting the last two 24 inch cabinet carcasses assembled, preparing the wood for the last 14 inch cabinet and, with the help of Augustine, getting the last wall ready for final spraying. The weather cooperated most of the time with temperatures high enough to be out in short sleeve shirts.

On the 21st I did more research into the engine selection and I am still very up on using the 302 cubic inch engine stroked to 347 cubic inch with electronic fuel injection. Here are some photos of the engine from The Engine Factory:

Photo courtesy of the Engine Factory of the Small Block Ford Fuel Injected Engine.

Photo courtesy of the Engine Factory of the Small Block Ford Fuel Injected Engine.
Photo courtesy of the Engine Factory of the Small Block Ford Fuel Injected Engine.

Photo courtesy of the Engine Factory of the Small Block Ford Fuel Injected Engine.

Photo courtesy of the Engine Factory of the Small Block Ford Fuel Injected Engine.

The EFI uses a throttle body injection system that replaces the normal carburetor. Photo courtesy of the Engine Factory.

Photo courtesy of the Engine Factory of the Small Block Ford Fuel Injected Engine.

Photo courtesy of the Engine Factory of the Small Block Ford Fuel Injected Engine.

These photos do not show the compressor for the air conditioning unit which would also be driven by the pulley system.

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